Why You Should Have TCP Port 80 Open Outbound On Your ADFS Server?

Active Directory Federation Services (ADFS) performs a lot of tasks when it comes to authenticating users into CRM securely. One of those tasks in particular is a certification revocation check to validate that the certificates being used are still valid. ADFS completes this process by reaching out to certification revocation lists (CRLs) over TCP port 80 – basic HTTP communication.

What we’ve seen is that businesses will want to lock down their ADFS servers just to be on the “safe side” and that includes closing TCP Port 80 outbound (e.g. no internet access). If left in its default state, ADFS will break and cause authentication to fail as it knows that it is supposed to check the CLRs to validate the certificate before issuing a token to allow a user into CRM. If it cannot do this, it will not issue a token. You may see an error similar to the following in the ADFS event viewer logs after a failed authentication attempt:

adfsport80

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Event ID: 364

Microsoft.IdentityServer.AuthenticationFailedException: MSIS3014: The encryption certificate of the relying party trust ‘https://crm.domain.com/’ identified by thumbprint ’01DEDF6E6F532BF7357457EBEC31DA82SFDA1234′ is not valid. It might indicate that the certificate has been revoked, has expired, or that the certificate chain is not trusted. —>

Microsoft.IdentityServer.Service.SecurityTokenService.RevocationValidationException: MSIS3014: The encryption certificate of the relying party trust ‘https://crm.domain.com/’ identified by thumbprint ’01DEDF6E6F532BF7357457EBEC31DA82SFDA1234′ is not valid. It might indicate that the certificate has been revoked, has expired, or that the certificate chain is not trusted.

So what are your options?

  1. Have your networking team open TCP 80 outbound on the ADFS server(s). This would also apply to all ADFS Proxies or WAP servers. While opening a port might seem less secure at face value it would actually be the opposite as ADFS is able to validate the certificates being used.

 

  1. The less preferred, but still acceptable, method would be turning off the Certificate Revocation Check of ADFS. The check is controlled individually for each relying party in ADFS so it would need to be turned off for all one by one. To do this open an admin PowerShell prompt and issue the following command:

                    Set-ADFSRelyingPartyTrust  -TargetName <relyingpartytrustName> -EncryptionCertificateRevocationCheck None